Sign Up for Mental Health First Aid

Mental health challenges are more common than ever. Are you concerned about a friend or family member? Do you want to gain confidence in talking about mental health? Do you want to know more about what to do in a crisis?

Join the Mental Health Association in Tompkins County for a free Mental Health First Aid training on Saturday, July 9, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) is a comprehensive course from the National Council for Mental Wellbeing that teaches participants how to identify, understand and respond to signs of mental illnesses and substance use disorders.

The training teaches the skills to reach out and provide initial help and support to an adult who may be developing a mental health or substance use problem or experiencing a crisis.  

To receive certification, participants must attend for the full-day course, and complete a 2-hour self-paced pre-course. (For those without computer/internet access for the self-paced course, the Mental Health Association can provide space and a computer.)

This training is provided in partnership with The History Center in Tompkins County with financial support from The Sophie Fund.

MHFA covers:

         •        Common signs and symptoms of mental health challenges

         •        Common signs and symptoms of substance use challenges

         •        How to interact with a person in crisis

         •        How to connect a person with help

         •        Information on trauma and its impacts

         •        Self-care

MHFA teaches a five-step action plan for first aiders:

         •        A: Assess for risk of suicide or harm

         •        L: Listen nonjudgmentally

         •        G: Give reassurance and information

         •        E: Encourage appropriate professional help

         •        E: Encourage self-help and other support strategies

WHEN: Saturday July 9, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (with a break for lunch on your own)

WHERE: The History Center in Tompkins County, 110 N. Tioga Street (Ithaca Commons), Ithaca, NY 14850

COST: Free

TO REGISTER: Contact Melanie Little, Director of Education, at mlittle@mhaedu.org or (607) 273-9250.

—By Melanie Little

Melanie Little is the Director of Education and a Certified Peer Specialist at the Mental Health Association in Tompkins County

How Primary Care Visits Can Prevent Suicide Deaths

Healthcare expert Virna Little highlights a paradox in suicide prevention. Most primary care providers believe that suicide prevention is part of their role, she says. Yet, she adds, most of them also lack training during their education or professional experience in how to prevent suicide deaths among their patients.

Little was the featured presenter on June 16 at “Zero Suicide: Best Practices for Primary Care,” an event hosted via Zoom by The Sophie Fund and attended by Tompkins County physicians and their practices.

Her presentation walked attendees through a series of Zero Suicide protocols, including screening patients for suicide risk, assessing at-risk patients to determine appropriate levels of onward referrals, and developing safety plans to keep patients from acting on suicidal urges.

Little is internationally recognized for her work on integrating primary care and behavioral health, developing sustainable integrated delivery systems, and suicide prevention. She is the chief operating officer and co-founder of Concert Health, a national organization providing behavioral health services to primary care providers. She has conducted Zero Suicide trainings for more than 3,000 primary care providers in 27 states, and has spoken at the White House on national suicide prevention strategies.

The Zero Suicide Model is a set of strategies and tools for suicide prevention in healthcare as well as behavioral health care systems. It holds that by closing gaps in care through quality improvement measures, suicide deaths for patients in health and behavioral health systems are preventable. It is endorsed by the U.S. surgeon general and the State of New York’s Office of Mental Health. It is also advocated by the Tompkins County Suicide Prevention Coalition, whose 2022-2025 strategic plan identifies implementing Zero Suicide in healthcare across the county as one of its five goals.

Little stressed that primary care settings can “really move the needle” in reducing suicides. About 46,000 Americans take their own lives each year. Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, and the second leading cause for people between 10-34.

Little urged primary care practices to operate a care system for treating patients at risk for suicide just as they do for patients with other chronic illnesses such as diabetes or asthma. She cited data showing that most people who died by suicide had a primary care visit within a month of their death. She noted that healthcare regulatory bodies, such as The Joint Commission, are saying “Listen, you really have to think about how you care for your patients at risk for suicide.”

DOWNLOAD: Primary Care Toolkit for Suicide Prevention

Little started by explaining the need for everyone on a practice’s care team to be aware of patients who are assessed as being at risk of suicide.

She related the story of a young woman who died by suicide after phoning her doctor’s office to cancel three appointments. The staff member who took the calls was unaware that the patient had been flagged as a suicide risk so took no steps to raise an alarm about the cancellations.

Little said that providers often tell her that they don’t know what to do if a patient shares that they are thinking of suicide.

“There’s one thing that is really the most helpful for people, and anyone can do it regardless of your background, your discipline, how long you’ve been in the practice,” she said. “That’s to give someone hope. We can all give someone hope.”

“It could very well be the first time that they’ve talked about suicide, or ever told anyone that they were thinking about suicide,” she said. “And so we want to make sure that our initial response is something that is going to be incredibly helpful for people, and to make sure that they know this is a safe place.”

Not to be caught off guard or utter an inappropriate message, she advises providers to create their own “storage statements”—words they can quickly use to show a suicidal patient that their life matters and to give them hope.

“Thank you for telling me.”

“You’re really important to us here at the center.”

“Your life is really important to me. Your life matters to me.”

“I have hope for you. I can see how strong you are.”

DOWNLOAD: Mental Health Support and Crisis Services in Tompkins County

Little said she was sympathetic to providers who feel that they don’t have enough time with individual patients to address the complexity of someone presenting with a risk of suicide. But she argued that providers have to think about implementing the same system of care for suicide as they do for other chronic illnesses. For example, she said, that may mean moving on to the next patient but coming back later to speak with the suicidal patient again.

“It would be a beautiful day in primary care if people came in for just one thing, or they came in for what turned out to be the most important, or life threatening thing.”

Little shared a personal story of how her husband went to his doctor complaining about hearing loss. The provider routinely took his height, weight, temperature, and blood pressure, and then informed him, “Listen, I’m really concerned, your pressure is incredibly high. I’m, not sure you’re going to be able to go home.” Little said the visit turned into one completely focused on blood pressure rather than hearing loss.

For patients at risk of suicide, she said, “We do the same things. We stop. We get information. We ask some questions. And we figure out an alternate level of care if we need one, or an appropriate level of care. That’s the way to start to think about patients who are at risk for suicide.”

Little observed that providers often administer the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), a screening tool for depression. Little said that providers are recommended to use additional  evidence-based, suicide-specific tools that provide indications of suicide plans, methods, and intent: the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS) and the Ask Suicide-Screening Questions (ASQ) tool.

She noted that there is a spectrum of suicidality, and that it is important to refer patients to appropriate levels of care. She cautioned against automatic referrals to emergency departments, saying that this can in some cases exacerbate a patient’s mental health condition.

 “I worked for 17 years in the Putnum Hospital emergency room in New York State,” she said. “There is no magic that happens there. Most people I actually did not admit because that was not the level of care that they needed. So we really want to think about assessing risk, which can and does happen every single day in primary care settings, and can happen for suicide just like it does for other chronic illnesses.”

Little highlighted the importance of developing safety plans for patients, likening them to the “stop, drop, and roll” drill that children learn about what steps to take if their clothes ever catch fire.

“The likelihood that we’re going catch on physical fire is not very high, but we all know what to do,” she said. “So I want you to know what to do in case you catch on emotional fire.”

She said the safety plan should include providing the at-risk individual with the number of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline—988 or (800) 253-8255—and actually having them put the number in their phone on the spot. Little’s presentation cited the Stanley-Brown Safety Planning Intervention, in which providers work with patients to develop a six-part safety plan that lists the individual’s internal coping strategies, distraction strategies, people and professionals they can contact in a crisis, and lethal means restriction strategies.

Little explained that discussing restricted access to lethal means with their patients is a critical piece of the safety plan. For people at risk of suicide, keeping guns out of harms way, or having a pharmacy issue prescription medications in individual pill packs, can really save lives, she said.

Little said she also directs at-risk patients to tools such as the Now Matters Now website, which includes videos with real people explaining the skills they’ve learned for coping with suicidal thoughts.

Little said once the appointment is over, caring contacts are “incredibly helpful” for people. She said providers should send a text or an email saying “Really glad we had a chance to see you today, I’m looking forward to seeing you next week.”

Little recalled being approached by one of her patients at a grocery store. “This woman came up to me, she pulled my note out of her purse, and said, ‘Virna, I carry this with me. It’s helpful.’ Just knowing that somebody out there cared gave her hope. Don’t underestimate the value of giving somebody hope.”

In conclusion, Little stressed the need for primary care providers to manage patients at risk for suicide like they would those with other chronic illnesses.

“If I am having asthma, and I come into your practice, what do you do? You might give me a treatment. you would ask me questions about my medication in my history. You would ask me about environmental triggers. You would ask me about emotional triggers. You might give me some education around how to use a rescue inhaler. You might make a referral to someone to come out to my home, or to a pulmonologist. You might do an asthma action plan. And so, when you think about all of those steps that you would do, you do that routinely for lots of chronic illnesses. All of that would be incredibly applicable to someone who was at risk for suicide.”

Little’s event was the fourth in a series of five presentations and trainings on Zero Suicide that The Sophie Fund is providing to the Tompkins County healthcare community. In July, along with the Tompkins County Mental Health Services, The Sophie Fund will co-host “Zero Suicide Roundtable: A Discussion on Best Practices in Suicide Prevention with Tompkins County Healthcare Leaders.”

If you or someone you know feels the need to speak with a mental health professional, you can contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 988 or 1-800-273-8255, or contact the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741-741.

READ MORE: Suicide Prevention in Tompkins County

Sign Up to Help Prevent Suicide

The vision of the suicide prevention community is a world free from suicide loss—a world where no one experiences the pain of a co-worker, friend, or family member taking their own life. We can all play a part toward advancing this vision.

LivingWorks ASIST is a leading suicide intervention training program, whose mission is to make that better world possible through high-quality training programs that empower everyone to make a difference, no matter who they are or what they do.

Suicide Prevention & Crisis Service is proud to be hosting a free LivingWorks ASIST workshop in Ithaca on June 27-28 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

The face-to-face workshop features powerful audiovisuals, discussions, and simulations. Participants learn how to prevent suicide by recognizing signs, providing a skilled intervention, and developing a safety plan to keep someone alive. Studies show that ASIST participants gain the confidence to help save a life.

More than 30 peer-reviewed studies and government reports on LivingWorks ASIST have found that the training:

  • Improves skills and readiness.
  • Is safe for trainees, with no adverse effects from training.
  • Increases hope and reduces suicidality through interventions.
  • Increases general counseling and listening skills.
  • Saves lives and costs, yielding a return on investment of up to 50:1.

Suicide is the second leading cause of death among Americans aged 10-34. Over the past five years, Tompkins County has averaged 12 suicide deaths per year. An estimated 300 people in our community may attempt suicide every year. Another 1,600 parents, children, siblings, friends, and spouses may be impacted by resulting psychological, spiritual, and/or financial loss.

While rates for other causes of death have remained steady or declined, the U.S. suicide rate increased 35.2% from 1999 to 2018.  At any given time, one in 25 people is thinking about suicide to some degree.

LivingWorks ASIST is trusted by professionals yet learnable by anyone, Those who go through the workshop make their communities safer from suicide by providing life-saving interventions.

Please help us make our community suicide-safer.

HOW TO REGISTER:

To register, contact SPCS Executive Director Tiffany Bloss at blosst@ithacacrisis.org. Registration is free of charge. The workshop takes place June 27-28 at the Conference Center, South Hill Business Campus, 950 Danby Road, Ithaca. Light breakfast, lunch, and snacks are provided.

—By Tiffany Bloss

Tiffany Bloss is the executive director of Suicide Prevention & Crisis Service in Ithaca

Story House Ithaca: Sharing Stories, Building Community 

Story House Ithaca is built on a simple idea: Communities are healthier and more interesting when people get to know each other better. We think sharing stories can help make that happen.

Story House Ithaca co-directors Lesley Greene and Jonathan Miller with Nia Nunn of the Southside Community Center (L) and Christa Nuñez of The Learning Farm (R)

And not just “once upon a time” types of stories. There are many different ways to communicate experience and ideas—in fiction and nonfiction, poetry and song, journalism and documentary, theater and dance, oral history and spoken word, photography and film, puppetry and mime, graphics and animation, social media, multimedia, and media yet to be invented. We’d love for Story House to be a home for any and all of those forms of storytelling. 

We sometimes talk about Story House as if it’s an actual house. It isn’t, at least not yet. Our main inspirations are physical spaces where people come to gather—notably a wonderful building in the Netherlands called Story House Belvédère. But we don’t have the funds for our own place now, and we think there are advantages to popping up in public or online or in other people’s spaces. Who needs a building when you have the world? 

So what does Story House actually do? Since our first foray into programming in late 2019, we’ve organized an exhibition and event series on migration, a series of readings on exile and the search for home, and a panel on press freedom around the world. We produced a community-sourced video imagining life after the pandemic and a video celebrating the women and girls of a local community organization. We’ve sponsored workshops on cartooning, comedy, and songwriting, and promoted storytelling performances and a comedy show. On several occasions, we’ve collected video for other organizations eager to tell their own stories. Recently, we launched a speaker series we call “Placemakers,” featuring people and groups using art and culture to build community. 

Our most ambitious project to date is “Breaking Our Silence: Storytelling for Mental Health.” This is a series of events beginning April 23 that includes a film screening and Q&A, movement workshops on dealing with anxiety and grief, an open mic story night, storytelling performances at local churches, a panel on writing about mental illness, an advocacy workshop, and a community celebration at Ithaca High School that includes choral music, theater, dance, storytelling, and more. 

READ MORE “Breaking Our Silence”

One advantage to having such a loose definition of “story” is that we have no problem coming up with programming ideas. Lurking on our Google Drive is a spreadsheet with an ever-growing list. Several are for ongoing series, like the open mic Story Night that launches May 3, or a monthly Bar Choir, where friends and strangers can come together to learn and perform a song in three-part harmony, or a Listening Room for group deep dives into great audio, or a regular meet-up for swapping stories through song.

We’re also keen on annual or seasonal events, like a Black film festival that we hope becomes an Ithaca tradition, or events around Mother’s Day, Veteran’s Day, Indigenous People’s Day, or Mental Health Awareness Month. And we’re always game for one-off events (one of our favorites is a wide-open show-and-tell called This Thing I Did).

And we’re not just about events! With or without our own facility, we’d love to become a maker space for storytellers in any medium, where folks can work on projects together, or teach and learn and develop new skills. 

Which leads to another big idea behind Story House. It’s not about us. The Ithaca area is full of amazing groups and talented people. We’re happy to create and present original programming, but we see our greatest value as a catalyst and connector. Everyone has stories to tell, and we’d like to help them tell them. That may mean organizing a workshop or course, or helping with fundraising or planning or publicizing an event. Or it may just mean providing a soapbox and microphone and stepping out of the way. 

Story House Ithaca is a project of the nonprofit Center for Transformative Action. In all our programs and activities, we are committed to creating inclusive spaces that welcome diversity. We strive to foster interactions between people of different cultures, ethnicities, and socioeconomic backgrounds, with the goal of working toward shared understanding and a more equitable, anti-racist society.

If you’d like to be involved, or if you have an idea for a program, don’t be a stranger!

By Jonathan Miller and Lesley Greene

Jonathan Miller and Lesley Greene are the co-directors of Story House Ithaca. Miller is a journalist and documentary producer, and a board member of Ithaca City of Asylum. Greene is a playwright and theater producer, and the co-founder and co-organizer of Porchfest.

For more information, go to Story House Ithaca’s website. Send program ideas through the website’s “Pitch Us” form, or email info@storyhouseithaca.org. Follow Story House Ithaca on Facebook and Instagram

Celebrate Mental Health!

More than a dozen Tompkins County nonprofits participated in the Mental Health and Wellness Fair on May 7 at the Bernie Milton Pavilion in the Ithaca Commons. Thanks to the kind and compassionate souls who are working so hard to support mental health in our community! Gratitude to Josephine Gibson and the Mental Health Association in Tompkins County for hosting this opportunity to celebrate Mental Health Awareness Month 2022.

Mental Health Association in Tompkins County

Racker

Racker’s message board

Suicide Prevention & Crisis Service

Family & Children’s Service of Ithaca

Planned Parenthood of Greater New York

Tompkins Families

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Ithaca & Tompkins County

Village at Ithaca

Lakeview Health Services

The Sophie Fund

Southern Tier AIDS Program