A Plan to Manage My College Mental Health

Last semester was the definition of rough. I faced consistent academic, social, and personal obstacles that I wasn’t at all prepared for. And the crazy part is, these stressors don’t even take into account the issues that I faced as a member of the Ithaca and Cornell University communities.

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Amber Haywood, chair of the Mental Health Summit at Cornell University

From the rumors of a potential school shooter on campus to an unfortunate death of a fellow student on graduation weekend, there was a lot to handle as a freshman. All these incidents took a toll mentally.

To cope with the chaos, I incorporated some mental health strategies into my life; and while some worked well, others ended up hurting me in the long run. Here are few of the methods that worked well for me:

  • Exercise! My personal favorites are group fitness classes (try spinning!). While I’m not always excited to work out, I learned that exercising indeed releases endorphins, which reduces your perception of pain and triggers a positive feeling in the body.
  • Social Media Cleanse! After not having access to wifi or phone service for a portion of winter break, I realized how much time I spent on social media. The time that I was on social media could easily have been devoted to something more important and useful to me. Not to mention, that by spending so much time on social media, I was comparing myself to students, friends, and people I didn’t even know that well. All these toxic thoughts of comparison were weighing on me more than I even realized. After deleting social media completely, I found that I was able to concentrate more time on homework and, consequently, saw my academics improve significantly. I realize that this is a difficult task for some, so an easier alternative is to limit yourself to a singular social media platform, or to limit the amount of time you spend on social media (e.g. only giving yourself two hours a day on it, or not checking social media an hour before you go to sleep/after you wake up).
  • Schedule “Me” Time! Blocking out specific times for relaxing, Netflixing, reading for pleasure, etc. Scheduling time in for self care helps make you more accountable for actually practicing regular self care! I personally block out an hour, normally when I know I get tired. Trying out different times and knowing your body rhythm will help when you feel yourself running low on energy!
  • Getting Away From Campus! This may be the hardest one physically and financially, but for me, it’s the most rewarding. Seeing new sites and being in a different setting has renewing effects on the mind. This can be catching a fan bus to a football game in Philly, taking a road trip to the nearest Chick-fil-A or even finding a new hiking trail around Ithaca!

I’ve developed many techniques for improving mental health due to my involvement in Building Ourselves through Sisterhood and Service (B.O.S.S.), a Cornell student organization. Come share your mental health practices, while learning from others, at B.O.S.S.’s annual Mental Health Summit taking place at Cornell from November 9–11. The summit is free and open to any self-identifying womyn of color.

The keynote address is by Dior Vargas, the Latina feminist mental health activist and creator of the People of Color and Mental Illness Photo Project. Workshops will tackle subjects including relationships, depression, body image, and communicating with professionals and family about mental health issues.

Click here for more information about the summit and how to register. Click here for more information about the summit and how to register.

–By Amber Haywood

Amber Haywood ’21 is the chair of the Mental Health Summit hosted by Building Ourselves through Sisterhood and Service (B.O.S.S.) at Cornell University from November 9–11

Send Silence Packing @ Ithaca College

Backpacks were scattered all over Ithaca College’s Emerson Suites on Monday. No, this high-traffic space wasn’t a convenient dumping ground for students taking mid-terms or heading to the cafeteria for a meal. The backpacks were a powerful exhibition called “Send Silence Packing,” a suicide prevention initiative traveling to American college campuses. The 1,100 backpacks represent the average number of college students who die by suicide every year.

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“Send Silence Packing” is a project of Active Minds, a national organization promoting student mental health through branch chapters at colleges around the county. Ithaca College’s chapter, led by co-presidents Zoe Howland and Mikaela Vojnik, hosted Monday’s exhibition in Emerson Suites.

The display is immersive and thought provoking. Each backpack includes a personal story or a quote from someone who has lost a loved to suicide. “I feel like the visual display really invokes a certain feeling that just talking about it doesn’t necessarily do,” Howland said.

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“There were a lot of people who came through on the way to their classes and were really intrigued with all the stories that were on the backpacks,” said Active Minds member Kristin Butler. She said that the event was an opportunity for “continuing the conversation on campus, which is great.”

Junior anthropology major Paige Twinning commented: “Powerful and important. The visual representation and personal profiles of individuals really made an impact.”

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“Send Silence Packing,” which has visited almost 200 campuses and reached nearly a million people, is intended to generate discussions about suicide and provide information about suicide prevention resources.

Ithaca College’s day-long event, sponsored in part by The Sophie Fund, began at 7:30 a.m. and included an evening Speak Your Mind panel discussion on suicide prevention moderated by Active Minds member Kelly Madden. Participating in the panel were representatives from key local mental health organizations, including the Suicide Prevention and Crisis Service, Mental Health Association in Tompkins County, National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Finger Lakes, and the Advocacy Center. Said Kaylee McGillicuddy, a sophomore psychology major: “It’s just nice to know there are people who care.”

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Based on surveys, the Active Minds national organization reports that most people attending the “Send Silence Packing” installation are left wanting to know more about mental health, and 95 percent of attendees rate the experience as powerful.

Active Minds has chapters or other operations on more than 600 college campuses across the country. In June, a study of Active Minds published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry reported that student peer organizations’ activities can improve college student mental health attitudes and perceived knowledge and significantly increase helping behaviors.

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The Fall 2015 National College Health Assessment, in a survey of 19,861 students at more than 40 American schools, reported that 35.3 percent “felt so depressed that it was difficult to function.”

According to the 2017 annual report of the Center for Collegiate Mental Health, data collected from 147 college counseling centers showed that 34.2 percent of 161,014 college students seeking counseling in the 2016–17 academic year had “seriously considered attempting suicide.” The rate increased for the seventh year in a row, up from 24 percent in the 2010-11 academic year. The data also showed that 10 percent of the students seeking counseling had actually made a suicide attempt.

—By Margaret McKinnis

Margaret McKinnis, an intern at The Sophie Fund, is a junior at Ithaca College majoring in Writing and minoring in English and Honors. She is a nonfiction editor at Stillwater, a student literary magazine, and an assistant director of the New Voices Literary Festival.

[If you or someone you know feels the need to speak with a mental health professional, you can contact the Crisisline (National Suicide Prevention Lifeline) at 1-800-273-8255 or contact the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741-741.]

New Voice for Mental Health

Greetings and welcome to Tiffanie Chai, a new contributor to the Ithaca Voice, whose bi-weekly column “Within the Bell Jar,” discusses mental health, mental illness, and disabilities. She gives us a taste of what’s to come in her first piece this week, promising “a fresh take on mental health.”

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Tiffanie Chai (credit: Ithaca Voice)

Chai is wary of reliance on top-down approaches to mental health, arguing that initiatives by institutions to “raise mental health awareness” largely do so in a way that is attractive to their audiences and end up failing to combat structural stigma. So Chai is a breed of mental health advocate who fights the stigma by empowering people experiencing mental health struggles to tell their stories and to thus educate the rest of us.

An excerpt from Chai’s first column:

I do understand why the intricacies of mental illness can be difficult to comprehend for individuals who aren’t familiar with these issues. We are so used to equating disease with physically observable symptoms that the idea of certain disorders exhibiting themselves as behavioral changes can be hard to digest. However, most people will never feel comfortable bringing up their mental health issues regardless of how many times they’re told that “it’s time to talk about mental health.”

I want to paint the painfully raw stories possessed by people who are mentally ill as realistically as possible—the ones kept from the public eye because they’d make others feel uncomfortable. Good. I want you to be. It means you’re learning. As my twin flame Sylvia Plath once wrote, “To the person in the bell jar, blank and stopped as a dead baby, the world itself is a bad dream.”

Lansing Forum on Mental Health and Bullying

Mental health and bullying continue to be important issues facing our Lansing School District. The schools as well as the Board of Education are taking them very seriously. Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) is being taught in health classes. A survey is being sent out to ask the students for their views on the bullying issue and ideas on how to handle it.

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Yet, it is clear that what is currently being done is not sufficient. Many feel that the problem is getting worse. We need to address these issues as a community and work toward solutions. Together, we need to do what we can to create a safer and mentally healthy school community. It takes a village.

Toward that end, a community forum, “Mental Health & Bullying” will be held on Thursday October 18 at 7 p.m. in the Lansing Town Hall. This is an opportunity for all of us to share experiences, discuss perspectives, and work on solutions.

Among the ideas we might consider is The Be Kind People Project, which offers “unique and culturally relevant youth development programs that effectively combine academics, character education, nutrition, fitness, digital citizenship, civic awareness, teacher appreciation, and family engagement.”

Another idea worth discussing is launching a student mental health club, a platform being used at hundreds of secondary schools and on college campuses across the country. Newfield High School has a very active chapter of Sources of Strength. Ithaca High School is in the process of establishing a high school chapter of Active Minds, and Ithaca College has long had a robust chapter as well. A recent study found that across 12 California colleges, student-run efforts were associated with increased awareness of mental health issues, reduced stigma, and a rise in “helping behaviors.”

—By Beth Hogan Callister

Ithaca Cupcakes 2018: Special Awards

Contestants in the 3rd Annual Ithaca Cupcake Baking Contest on Saturday offered up some gorgeous and tasty entries—congratulations to these winners of Special Awards!

Most Masterful Musical Melody Award

Natalie McCaskill-Myers

Most Creatively Crafty Cupcake

Sally Brenner

Most Fabulously Floral Cupcake

Aušra Milano

Most Awesome Autumn

Robyn Schmitt

Most Magnificent Marvelous Moose Masterpiece

Claire Litwin

Most Sensationally Cinnamony Cupcake

Isabella Jones and Navia Marshall

Most Must Eat the Whole Chocolatey-Minty Thing Award

Rhonda Williamsee

The Everything Fun about Fall Cupcake

Sean Vickroy

Most Caramel Crave-Quenching Confection

Alana Craib

Chilliest Coconut Cake Confection

Matilde Portnoy

Best Cupcake to Take on the Trail

Ella Corson

Best Campfire Cupcake

Maggie Chutter

Most Likely to Make the Judges Go Coco for Coconut Award

Cierra Howard

Best Flavorful Fall Frosting

Jessara Thomas

Most Luxuriously Luscious Lavender Cupcake

Oluademi James-Daniel

Best Birthday cupCake

Ella Kain

Pretty in Pink Award

Ibtisaam Ahmed

Novel Neopolitan

Jenna Kain

Harvest Cupcake

Lianna White

Chocolate Chili

Sadie Hays

Best Carrot Top

Sul Jordan

Most Luscious Lemon

Talon Jordan

Tastiest Toastiest Pumpkin

Cristin McLaughin and Searra Lindhurst

Ultimate Chocolate Tower

Sonia and Ella Carr

Classic Superstar

Matt Jirsa for Cornell Minds Matter

 

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Natalie McCaskill-Myers’s entry:  Pumpkin apple spice cupcakes with cream cheese cardamom frosting, decorated with violins, soccer balls… and black cats representing Sophie’s cat Bagel and Natalie’s cat Curry Burger.

 

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Sally Brenner’s entry: Chocolate cupcakes with Key lime and kiwi-flavored frosting

 

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Aušra Milano’s entry: Amaretto chocolate cupcakes decorated with a flower arrangement

 

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Robyn Schmitt’s entry: Cinnamon and apple cupcakes

 

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Claire Litwin’s entry: Passion fruit curd, passion fruit mousse, and chocolate mousse in a joconde sponge cake, decorated with moose antlers in homage to the mousse layers

 

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Isabella Jones and Navia Marshall’s entry: Pumpkin spice cupcakes with maple frosting and a cinnamon stick

 

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Rhonda Williamsee’s entry: Mint chocolate “cocoa coma” cupcakes

 

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Sean Vickroy’s entry: Apple butter cupcakes with red winter frosting in the holiday spirit

 

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Alana Craib’s entry: Yellow cupcakes with maple frosting and candied walnuts

 

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Matilde Portnoy’s entry: “Tropicupcakes” with roasted almonds and cinnamon cream cheese frosting

 

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Ella Corson’s entry: Granola chocolate cupcakes with vanilla frosting

 

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Maggie Chutter’s entry: “Banana Boat Cupcakes,” with chocolate ganache core and meringue frosting

 

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Cierra Howard’s entry: “Macadamia Coconut Cupcakes,” frosted with Swiss meringue buttercream and topped with a coconut macaroon ball

 

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Jessara Thomas’s entry: Pumpkin and spice cupcakes with a pumpkin decoration on top

 

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Oluademi James-Daniel’s entry: Yellow lemon cupcake with a purple Earl Grey and lavender frosting

 

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Ella Kain’s entry: Lemon cupcakes with buttercream frosting

 

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Ibtisaam Ahmed: entry: “Rose Cupcakes, a Fusion of East and West.” American-style vanilla cupcakes with crème patisserie of European bakeries and delicate rose flavor common in North Africa, Middle East, Persia and the Indian subcontinent.

 

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Jenna Kain’s entry: Neapolitan cupcakes with strawberry buttercream frosting

 

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Lianna White’s entry: Gluten-free carrot, raisin, and walnut cupcakes with cashew buttercream frosting

 

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Sadie Hays’s entry: “Noche Buena,” a coffee and chili-infused New Mexican chocolate cupcake topped with whipped cream and a biscochito

 

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Sul Jordan’s entry: Pumpkin spice cupcakes with buttercream frosting

 

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Talon Jordan’s entry: Lemon cupcakes with vanilla buttercream frosting

 

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Cristin McLaughin and Searra Lindhurst’s entry: Vegan Pumpin S’more Vegan Cupcakes with marshmallow filling and chocolate frosting

 

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Sonia and Ella Carr’s entry: “The Chocolate Tower” triple-chocolate fudge cupcakes with strawberry-flavored fudge frosting

 

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Matt Jirsa for Cornell Minds Matter’s entry: Classic cupcakes with star-shaped sprinkles