It’s Mental Health Awareness Month!

“Mental illnesses are medical conditions that disrupt a person’s thinking, feeling, mood, daily functioning, and ability to relate to others. Mental illness doesn’t develop because of a person’s character or intelligence. Just as diabetes is a disorder of the pancreas, a mental illness is a disorder of the brain that can make it difficult to cope with the ordinary demands of life. No one is to blame—not the person, and not the family.”

So begins “Navigating a Mental Health Crisis,” a new resource guide for to help those experiencing a mental health emergency, published just in time for Mental Health Awareness Month.

Click here to download the guide

The guide includes sections explaining:

—How to understand mental health crises

—How to prepare for a crisis

—What to do during a crisis

—What to do following a crisis

—How to create a crisis plan

The guide is published by the National Alliance on Mental Illness. As NAMI explains:

When mental illness is present, the potential for crisis is never far from mind. Crisis episodes related to mental illness can feel incredibly overwhelming. There’s the initial shock, followed by a flood of questions—the most prominent of which is: “What can we do?”

People experiencing mental illness—and the people who care for them—need information. However, that information is not always readily available and the search for answers may require more energy and persistence than possible in times of crisis.

“Navigating a Mental Health Crisis: A NAMI Resource Guide for Those Experiencing a Mental Health Emergency” provides important, potentially life-saving information for people experiencing mental health crises and their loved ones. This guide outlines what can contribute to a crisis, warning signs that a crisis is emerging, strategies to help de-escalate a crisis, available resources and so much more.

Like any other health crisis, it’s important to address a mental health emergency quickly and effectively. With mental health conditions, crises can be difficult to predict because, often, there are no warning signs. Crises can occur even when treatment plans have been followed and mental health professionals are involved. Unfortunately, unpredictability is the nature of mental illness.

Unlike other health emergencies, people experiencing mental health crises often don’t receive instructions or materials on what to expect after the crisis. That is why we created this guide, so people experiencing mental health emergencies and their loved ones can have the answers and information they need when they need it.

Click here to find more information about NAMI

Click here to connect with NAMI-Finger Lakes chapter

Family & Children’s Service of Ithaca is hosting two special events during Mental Health Awareness Month.

On Thursday May 17 at 7:30 a.m. the organization will hold its annual breakfast celebration at the Country Club of Ithaca, 189 Pleasant Grove Road. The event will honor Lynette Scofield, Claudia Brenner, Sandy True, and the Cayuga at Twilight Committee. Tickets are available for $25 via Eventbrite. Support a great local mental health organization.

On Thursday May 31, F&CS hosts a community screening of The Mask You Live In, a film directed by Jennifer Siebel Newsom that follows a diverse group of boys and young men as they struggle to stay true to themselves while negotiating America’s narrow definition of masculinity. The screening to be followed by a panel discussion takes place at Cinemapolis, 120 East Green Street, from 6-9 p.m. Reserve seats at the Cinempolis website.

Watch the trailer!

Risky Business

May is Mental Health Awareness Month and #riskybusiness is Mental Health America’s theme this year. The Sophie Fund will be sharing materials from the #riskybusiness awareness campaign throughout the month.

2017 MHM Additional Shareable Image

As MHA’s awareness campaign explains:

“When you or someone you love is dealing with a mental health concern, sometimes it’s a lot to handle. It’s important to remember that mental health is essential to everyone’s overall health and well-being, and mental illnesses are common and treatable.

“Yet, people experience symptoms of mental illnesses differently—and some engage in potentially dangerous or risky behaviors to avoid or cover up symptoms of a potential mental health problem.

“That is why this year’s theme for May is Mental Health Month—Risky Business—is a call to educate ourselves and others about habits and behaviors that increase the risk of developing or exacerbating mental illnesses, or could be signs of mental health problems themselves.

“Activities like compulsive sex, recreational drug use, obsessive internet use, excessive spending, or disordered exercise patterns can all be behaviors that can disrupt someone’s mental health and potentially lead them down a path towards crisis.”

Click here to take MHA’s interactive quiz about when you think behaviors or habits go from being acceptable to unhealthy.

Click here to download MHA’s toolkit and spread the word about #riskybusiness yourself.

Emma Stone’s Story

Emma Stone, who won the 2016 Academy Award for Best Actress for her role in La La Land, has kicked off the Child Mind Institute’s #MyYoungerSelf video series for Mental Health Awareness Month. The 28-year-old Stone discusses her struggles with anxiety and panic disorder.

emma

Watch the video, and read the transcript:

Hi I’m Emma.

What I would tell kids that are going through anxiety, which I have and can relate to, is that you’re so normal it’s crazy. So many people—I mean, to say that “you’re so normal, it’s crazy” is a pretty funny thing to say—but, it is so normal.

Everyone experiences a version of anxiety or worry in their lives. And maybe we go through it in a different or more intense way for longer periods of time. But there’s nothing wrong with you.

To be a sensitive person, that cares a lot, that takes things in in a deep way, is actually part of what makes you amazing. And is one of the greatest gifts of life. You think a lot, and you feel a lot, and you feel deeply. And it’s the best. The trade off—I wouldn’t trade it for the world, even when there are really hard times. There are so many tools you can use to help yourself in those times.

It does gets better and easier as life goes on, and you start to get to know yourself more and what will trigger certain instances of anxiety and where you feel comfortable and safe.

So, I would just say, don’t ever feel like you are a weirdo for it. We are all weirdos!

#MyYoungerSelf is a series of honest stories from public figures about growing up with a mental health or learning disorder—what they would tell their younger selves about mental health. Click here to keep track of all the videos in the series throughout Mental Health Awareness Month in the United States.

#MyYoungerSelf is part of the institute’s annual public education campaign, Speak Up for Kids, which promotes awareness of children’s mental health issues and providing needed information to families, educators, the media, and policymakers. Speak Up for Kids aims to counter the stigma for the one in five children struggling with mental health or learning disorders.

The Child Mind Institute is an independent, national nonprofit dedicated to transforming the lives of children and families struggling with mental health and learning disorders. Its teams work “to deliver the highest standards of care, advance the science of the developing brain, and empower parents, professionals, and policymakers to support children when and where they need it most.”

Click here to read Refinery 29’s story about the Emma Stone video

Click here to read Vogue’s article on Emma Stone.

 

Mental Health Awareness Month 2016

The first day of May is the start of National Mental Health Awareness Month in the United States. Today is also the start of Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week.

Mental Health America (MHA) and its local affiliates around the country have led an annual observance of Mental Health Month since 1949. The observance seeks to reach millions of people through the media, local events, and screenings. Check out the toolkits on the MHA website aiding organizations and individuals who wish to engage with Mental Health Awareness Month.

MHM 2016 Social Media Images-FB Share Image

This year’s theme is “Life with a Mental Illness.” It encourages individuals to share what life with a mental illness feels like for them in words, pictures, and video by tagging their social media posts with #mentalillnessfeelslike (or submitting to MHA anonymously). Posts are being collected and displayed at mentalhealthamerica.net/feelslike.

Mental Health America, founded in 1909, is the nation’s leading community-based nonprofit dedicated to addressing the needs of those living with mental illness and to promoting the overall mental health of all Americans. It promotes mental health as a critical part of overall wellness, including prevention services for all, early identification and intervention for those at risk, and integrated care and treatment for those who need it, with recovery as the goal. Much of its current work is guided by the Before Stage 4 (#B4Stage4) philosophy—that mental health conditions should be treated long before they reach the most critical points in the disease process.

National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week is an annual event sponsored by the National Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health. This year’s theme is “Healthy Families, Resilient Children: Mental Health is a Family Affair!”

President Obama proclaimed May to be National Mental Health Awareness Month, stating in part: “This month, we renew our commitment to ridding our society of the stigma associated with mental illness, encourage those living with mental health conditions to get the help they need, and reaffirm our pledge to ensure those who need help have access to the support, acceptance, and resources they deserve.”

The full text of the presidential proclamation:

Nearly 44 million American adults, and millions of children, experience mental health conditions each year, including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and post-traumatic stress. Although we have made progress expanding mental health coverage and elevating the conversation about mental health, too many people still do not get the help they need. Our Nation is founded on the belief that we must look out for one another—and whether it affects our family members, friends, co-workers, or those unknown to us—we do a service for each other when we reach out and help those struggling with mental health issues. This month, we renew our commitment to ridding our society of the stigma associated with mental illness, encourage those living with mental health conditions to get the help they need, and reaffirm our pledge to ensure those who need help have access to the support, acceptance, and resources they deserve.

In the last 7 years, our country has made extraordinary progress in expanding mental health coverage for more people across America. The Affordable Care Act prohibits insurance companies from discriminating against people based on pre-existing conditions, requires coverage of mental health and substance use disorder services in individual and small group markets, and expands mental health and substance use disorder parity policies, which are estimated to help more than 60 million Americans. Nearly 15 million more Americans have gained Medicaid coverage since October 2013, significantly improving access to mental health care. And because of more than $100 million in funding from the Affordable Care Act, community health centers have expanded behavioral health services for nearly 900,000 people nationwide over the past 2 years. Still, far too few Americans experiencing mental illnesses do not receive the care and treatment they need. That is why my most recent Budget proposal includes a new half-billion dollar investment to improve access to mental health care, engage individuals with serious mental illness in care, and help ensure behavioral health care systems work for everyone.

Our Nation has made strong advances in improving prevention, increasing early intervention, and expanding treatment of mental illnesses. Earlier this year, I established a Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Parity Task Force, which aims to ensure that coverage for mental health benefits is comparable to coverage for medical and surgical care, improve understanding of the requirements of the law, and expand compliance with it. Mental health should be treated as part of a person’s overall health, and we must ensure individuals living with mental health conditions can get the treatment they need. My Administration also continues to invest in science and research through the BRAIN initiative to enhance our understanding of the complexities of the human brain and to make it easier to diagnose and treat mental health disorders early.

One of our most profound obligations as a Nation is to support the men and women in uniform who return home and continue fighting battles against mental illness. Last year, I signed the Clay Hunt SAV Act, which fills critical gaps in serving veterans with post-traumatic stress and other illnesses, increases peer support and outreach, and recruits more talented individuals to work on mental health issues at the Department of Veterans Affairs. This law will make it easier for veterans to get the care they need when they need it. All Americans, including service members, can get immediate assistance by calling the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK or by calling 1-800-662-HELP.

During National Mental Health Awareness Month, we recognize those Americans who live with mental illness and substance use disorders, and we pledge solidarity with their families who need our support as well. Let us strive to ensure people living with mental health conditions know that they are not alone, that hope exists, and that the possibility of healing and thriving is real. Together, we can help everyone get the support they need to recover as they continue along the journey to get well.

Now, therefore, I, Barack Obama, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 2016 as National Mental Health Awareness Month. I call upon citizens, government agencies, organizations, health care providers, and research institutions to raise mental health awareness and continue helping Americans live longer, healthier lives.