Cupcake Joy, 2017 Edition

Enjoy a photo gallery from the 2nd Annual Ithaca Cupcake Baking Contest, held in the Commons on October 14, 2017.

bannerBernie Milton Pavilion, October 14, 2017

 

registrationLet the Contest Begin: Angela registers Tamarynde Cacciotti’s entry, cream puff cupcakes with Earl Grey pastry filling that went on to win the Grand Prize.

 

alistrongwaterHappy Halloween: Ali Strongwater’s 2nd Prize-winning pumpkin and ginger cupcakes haunted by sugar ghosts.

 

alexanderRaspberries and Butterflies: Alexander Quilty’s 3rd prize-winning chocolate raspberry-filled cupcakes with raspberry buttercream frosting.

 

monicacottoEmerging Brightness: Monica Cotto’s vegan blood orange dark chocolate cupcakes topped with edible crystal geodes (Honorable Mention).

 

Beth Goelzer LyonsForest of Cupcakes: Beth Goelzer Lyons’s chocolate chip cookie dough-filled vegan chocolate cupcakes topped with chocolate trees.

 

melaniehardyFall Foilage: Melanie Hardy’s Campfire S’more Cupcakes with marshmallow fluff frosting topped with a Hershey bar (Honorable Mention).

 

robynschmittWinter Wonderland: Robin Schmitt’s vanilla cupcake topped by an edible peanut butter and nutella pine cone (Honorable Mention).

 

Lianna White“Healthiest Cupcake” Award: Lianna White’s gluten-free carrot raisin walnut cupcake.

 

nataliemccaskellLand of Unicorns: Natalie McCaskill-Meyers’s unicorn cupcakes won an Honorable Mention Award and “Best Youth Cupcake” Award.

 

judgesThe Hard Part: The judging begins!

 

judging2Tastes and Scents: The judging continues!

 

debbielazinskyCupcake Joy: Debbie Lazinsky of GreenStar Natural Foods Market samples the cupcake submissions.

 

alternativesfcuColoring Contest: Volunteers from Alternatives Federal Credit Union run the Coloring Contest for Under-8’s.

 

jacobparkercarverJacob Parker Carver of the Mental Health Association in Tompkins County sets up an interactive mental health quiz for attendees.

 

amyleviereAmy LeViere of the Community Foundation of Tompkins County welcomes the contestants.

 

IMG_9981Lee-Ellen Marvin, executive director of the Suicide Prevention & Crisis Service, thanks The Sophie Fund for being a catalyst for change in suicide prevention in Tompkins County.

 

yukojinguMeet the VIP Judges: Yuko Jingu (friend and co-worker of Sophie)

 

deleilanormanMeet the VIP Judges: Daleila Norman of GreenStar Natural Foods Market

 

ameliasauterMeet the VIP Judges: Amelia Sauter of Felicia’s Atomic Brewhouse and Bakery

 

Mary Sever Schoonmaker“Richest Cupcake” Award: Mary Sever Schoonmaker receives a GreenStar gift certificate for her chocolate zucchini cupcakes with meringue frosting garnished with cashew toffee bark.

 

tamaryndecacciotti copyShe’s No. 1: Tamarynde Cacciotti with her Grand Prize award for her cream puff cupcakes with Earl Grey pastry filling and mocha buttercream frosting.

 

mickiequinnThe Maestro: Event Producer Mickie Quinn

Money, Power, and Sexual Assault (Part 2)

In 2016 and 2017, two of the country’s most powerful conservatives—Roger Ailes and Bill O’Reilly of Fox News—were shown the door for sexual harassment of female subordinates. This week—thanks in part to the willingness of harassment victims to speak out—it’s the turn of one of America’s most influential liberals: Hollywood film producer Harvey Weinstein.

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An investigation by the New York Times—whose reporting last April led to O’Reilly’s precipitous downfall—revealed sexual misconduct allegations against Weinstein stretching over nearly three decades. After being confronted with allegations including sexual harassment and unwanted physical contact, the newspaper reported, Weinstein reached at least eight settlements with women.

According to the Times:

In interviews, eight women described varying behavior by Mr. Weinstein: appearing nearly or fully naked in front of them, requiring them to be present while he bathed or repeatedly asking for a massage or initiating one himself. The women, typically in their early or middle 20s and hoping to get a toehold in the film industry, said he could switch course quickly—meetings and clipboards one moment, intimate comments the next.

In a statement to the Times, Weinstein apologized for his behavior: “I appreciate the way I’ve behaved with colleagues in the past has caused a lot of pain, and I sincerely apologize for it. Though I’m trying to do better, I know I have a long way to go.”

Meanwhile, the board of the Weinstein Company—known for such films as Django Unchained, The King’s Speech, and Silver Linings Playbook—announced that Weinstein was taking an indefinite leave of absence; one-third of the board had immediately resigned amid the allegations of rampant sexual harassment by the company’s co-chairman.

The Times story cites a multi-page 2015 memo to company executives by Weinstein employee Lauren O’Connor, which detailed sexual harassment she and other women experienced at the hands of their boss. She wrote:

“There is a toxic environment for women at this company. I am a professional and have tried to be professional. I am not treated that way however. I am sexualized and diminished.

“I am a 28-year old-woman trying to make a living and a career. Harvey Weinstein is a 64-year-old, world famous man and this is his company. The balance of power is me: 0, Harvey Weinstein: 10.

“I am just starting out in my career, and have been and remain fearful about speaking up. But remaining silent is causing me great distress.”

Following a settlement with Weinstein, the Times reported, O’Connor withdrew her complaint six days after sending her memo.

Weinstein is known as a champion of liberal causes, and a donor to Democratic Party candidates. Former President Barack Obama’s eldest daughter Malia interned at the Weinstein Company last summer. Weinstein recently helped endow a faculty chair at Rutgers University in the name of feminist icon Gloria Steinem.

The combined force of power and money was evident in Hollywood’s deafening silence after the scandal broke:

In the wake of the blockbuster Times exposé, The Daily Beast reached out to dozens of prominent actors, actresses, and filmmakers—who both have and have not worked with Weinstein—only to receive many replies of “no comment” and plenty of radio silence.

“Nauseating, chicken-hearted enablers all—all the people who knew and said nothing—and those who are STILL staying silent,” TV personality/writer/chef Anthony Bourdain, one of the few celebrities who did speak out, tweeted in response to the Beast story. Bourdain, who made clear he was not referring to Weinstein’s victims, has 6.45 million Twitter followers.

We Can All Prevent Suicide

September is Suicide Prevention Month all around the world. Click here and take a few minutes to review one of the best resources out there—the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.

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We can all prevent suicide, and the Lifeline provides tools for recognizing risk factors and warning signs in yourself and in others. It also operates a critical 24/7 hotline at 1-800-273-8255 to find support for yourself or others.

As the Lifeline puts it:

Suicide is not inevitable for anyone. By starting the conversation, providing support, and directing help to those who need it, we can prevent suicides and save lives.

Evidence shows that providing support services, talking about suicide, reducing access to means of self-harm, and following up with loved ones are just some of the actions we can all take to help others.

By offering immediate counseling to everyone that may need it, local crisis centers provide invaluable support at critical times and connect individuals to local services.

[If you or someone you know feels the need to speak with a mental health professional, you can contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or contact the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741-741.]

 

 

Military Suicides: Understanding “Moral Injury”

As America commemorates Memorial Day honoring those who gave their lives for their country, let us recognize the tragedy of military suicides among active duty soldiers and veterans.

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In 2014, 273 U.S. servicemen died by suicide compared to 58 killed in action in Afghanistan (55) and Iraq (3). And 7,403 vets took their own lives in 2014—18 percent of all adult suicides in the United States—according to the Veteran’s Administration. A factor receiving increasing attention in military suicides is known as moral injury.

Military service by definition is fraught with moral quandaries, from whether a particular war is “just” or an individual action within a “just” war is morally right. Psychiatrist Jonathan Shay, a specialist in combat trauma who has studied Vietnam veterans, says moral injury “is present when there has been a betrayal of “what’s right,” either by a person in legitimate authority or by one’s self, in a high stakes situation.” Both forms of moral injury impair the capacity for trust and elevate despair, suicidality, and interpersonal violence, Shay says.

Laura Greenstein of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) illustrates the dilemma:

Imagine you are a young soldier leading your unit on a foot patrol in an Afghan village. One moment your environment is peaceful, the next your unit hears a loud explosion and you realize you are taking fire from the enemy. You find a secure position to radio your overhead observer, to determine where the threat is originating. It’s your job to take out the enemy before any soldiers or innocent civilians are harmed. Your overhead observer gives you the location and describes the enemy for you: an 11-year-old Afghan boy who is firing at your unit with a machine gun. At this point, you are ordered to take out the enemy. You follow the orders to save your soldiers and the innocent civilians in the village.

Six months later, you finished your deployment and are welcomed home by your friends and family. You begin to remember many of the experiences from your deployment, several you wish you could forget—including the day with the 11-year-old boy. This experience has made you question who you are, the morality you believe you had and causes you to worry that people may view you differently.

Writing in The Conversation, Holly Arrow and William M. Schumacher explain how mental health treatment and positive social interactions can help the healing:

Preliminary evidence suggests that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) modified to treat issues related to moral injury can reduce depression as well as guilt- and shame-related thoughts. Treatment can come in other forms, as well. Psychotherapist Edward Tick, for example, organizes trips to Vietnam for U.S. veterans to meet their Vietnamese counterparts, for the healing of decades-long wounds.

However, we don’t need to be trained therapists to make a difference. Everyday social connections can also help the morally injured heal. In his dissertation, the second author of this article conducted a series of interviews with veterans exposed to potentially morally injurious events and found consistent differences between those with higher levels of depression and suicidal thoughts and those with fewer symptoms. Veterans who weren’t doing so well felt isolated and lacked support by friends, by family and by peers. Veterans with few symptoms felt supported by family, friends, peers and by their community. That’s the rest of us.

When we discover that someone has a military background, replacing the perfunctory “Thank you for your service” (which rarely leads to a meaningful exchange) with questions that start a conversation can create a new connection. The hopes, dreams, insecurities and mistakes of those who have served may be somewhat different based on their military background; many won’t be different at all.

Photo: Airmen of the 374th Security Forces Squadron, Yokota Air Base, Japan, May 15, 2017. Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson/U.S. Air Force

 
[If you or someone you know feels the need to speak with a mental health professional, you can contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or contact the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741-741.]

[Veterans Crisis Line connects Veterans in crisis and their families and friends with Department of Veterans Affairs responders through a confidential toll-free hotline, online chat, or text. Veterans and their loved ones can call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1, chat online, or send a text message to 838255 to receive confidential support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.]

[Visit the NAMI Veterans and Active Duty page for treatment resources, disclosure, and staying healthy during the transition to civilian life.]

 

Briefing Mayor Myrick

Scott MacLeod, a donor advisor of The Sophie Fund, briefed Ithaca Mayor Svante Myrick Thursday on the fund’s newly adopted strategic plan and projects underway for 2017. The meeting was held in advance of a gathering on April 17 organized by The Sophie Fund of 30 mental health stakeholders from the greater Ithaca community and Tompkins County.

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MacLeod told the mayor that he and his wife Susan Hack set up The Sophie Fund after their daughter Sophie, a 23-year-old art student on a health leave of absence from Cornell University, took her own life in Ithaca on Easter weekend in 2016. MacLeod said Sophie’s shocking, unexpected death motivated his family to provide support and advocacy for suicide prevention and other mental health programs for young people in the Ithaca area.

The Sophie Fund Strategic Plan 2017 sets forth four goals:

To support mental health initiatives with tangible impact aiding young people in the Greater Ithaca community

To raise awareness and end the stigma around mental illness and treatment

To advance a zero suicide ethos in the community

To serve as a community advocate for young people struggling with mental illness

MacLeod also briefed Mayor Myrick on The Sophie Fund’s current projects, including: organizing the 2nd Annual Ithaca Cupcake Baking Contest; providing a grant for an author series sponsored by the Mental Health Association in Tompkins County; and developing a support system for students taking a health leave of absence from local colleges.

Mayor Myrick welcomed The Sophie Fund’s efforts and urged that strong attention be given to programs aiding struggling adolescents so that mental disorders affecting young people don’t escalate into more complicated and dangerous conditions in adulthood.

The Sophie Fund is a donor-advised fund under the umbrella of the Community Foundation of Tompkins County. As of December 31, 2016, 97 individuals and foundations had made donations to The Sophie Fund.