Cupcakes 2020: Let’s Pick the Winners!

Thanks to the more than 40 contestants who entered the 5th Annual Ithaca Cupcake Baking Contest (Virtual Edition)! Now the judging begins! Throughout the week, The Sophie Fund will publish posts here and on social media spotlighting all the cupcake masterpieces. On Saturday October 24, the judges will announce the winners in a Facebook Live Event. Stay tuned!

Contest Producer Mickie Quinn displaying 2019 entries

The Sophie Fund extends its deep thanks to the contest’s sponsors this year, GreenStar Food Co+op, Alternatives Federal Credit Union, and Well Said Media.

Our gratitude also goes to the student organizations supporting the contest: Active Minds at Ithaca College, Active Minds at Ithaca High School, and at Cornell University, Cornell Minds Matter; Alpha Phi Omega Gamma Chapter; Phi Sigma Pi honor fraternity; PATCH (Pre-Professional Association Towards Careers in Health); and Building Ourselves through Sisterhood and Service (BOSS).

Meanwhile, enjoy a slideshow of past Ithaca Cupcake Baking Contests held in the Ithaca Commons—hopefully we’ll be back at the Bernie Milton Pavilion again next October!

Blueberry Bourbon Cupcakes

Pumpkin Cupcakes

Cupcakes, and more cupcakes

The Judges

Have a cupcake?

Kitschy Scofflaw and GreenStar’s Debbie Lazinsky

The Alternatives crew

Alpha Phi Omega

Cornell Minds Matter

CMM’s Chelsea Kiely delivers a mental health message

Lyn Staack of the Advocacy Center of Tompkins County

Advocacy Center’s Lara Hamburger speaks on domestic violence and sexual assault

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

Mental Health Association in Tompkins County

Suicide Prevention and Crisis Service

Tompkins County Bullying Prevention Task Force

Nellia Mattson

Joe Gibson

SingTrece and Kenneth McLaurin

Josh Dolan

Hannah Martin

Ginny Maddock

Friend of The Sophie Fund

2019 Grand Prize Winner Zoë Dubrow

October is National Bullying Prevention Month

Concerned about bullying? Why not make a point to educate yourself and others during Bullying Prevention Month?

Photo credit: michaeljung/shutterstock

The Covid-19 coronavirus pandemic makes it challenging to organize observances or host other public activities, yet there are still lots of ways to join the movement to stop bullying.

Pacer’s National Bullying Prevention Center provides innovative resources for students, parents, educators, and others. Pacer recognizes bullying as a serious community issue that impacts education, physical and emotional health, and the safety and well-being of students.

The coordinators of the Tompkins County Bullying Prevention Task Force issued a page of Bullying Prevention Resources highlighting some of Pacer’s free online resources to engage students in social and emotional learning amid Covid-19 restrictions.

The resources include videos, art projects, role playing, pledge signing, and other activities that can be organized during Bullying Prevention Month.

Throughout October, the Tompkins County Youth Services Department and The Sophie Fund are hosting a social media campaign promoting bullying prevention awareness.

Designed by Ithaca College students Nicole Brokaw and Anna Moura, the campaign spotlights issues such as cyberbullying, preventing bullying, dating abuse, sexting, and smart social networking. The messaging is based on the work of organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the Cyberbullying Research Center.

“I think a lot of bullying can stem from fear and misunderstanding,” said Brokaw, 21, of Forest Hill, Maryland. “Being bullied can exacerbate low self-esteem in students, or compound the effects of any number of factors, like depression or anxiety, that can cause students to miss school or isolate themselves. Everyone deserves to be happy and confident and to have a supportive social circle.”

Moura, 20, of Forest Hills, Queens, reminds that bullying is no joke. “People tend to think it’s child’s play or that kids grow out of it, but what they don’t understand are the brutal and long-lasting effects that it can have on the individual,” she said. “Bullying consists of many other types of harassment, including discrimination and sexual harassment, which people usually don’t consider.”

The success of young people is dependent on their feelings of safety and connection to others, according to Bridgette Nugent, deputy director of the Tompkins County Youth Services Department and co-coordinator of the Tompkins County Bullying Prevention Task Force. “It is important to bring awareness to the serious issue of bullying and the need for a community response to address its negative impacts on our county’s youth,” she said.

Nugent calls attention to the aspect of cyberbullying. “During this time of ongoing social distancing and virtual learning, we must not forget that bullying exists both in-person and via the internet. We hope that by raising awareness and energizing the community throughout the month of October, we can engage with students, families, and community members to work towards an end to bullying in our county.”

Click any of the links to check out the campaign’s social media posts and share.

https://www.facebook.com/ToCoYouth/

https://www.facebook.com/thesophiefund/

https://www.instagram.com/thesophiefund/

Additional resources, including A Brief Guide to Youth Bullying Prevention, are available at http://www.thesophiefund.org/bullying/.

Bullying Prevention Month Poster [DOWNLOAD]

Our Community Is Working to Prevent Youth Bullying

More than 30 adults and young people joined members of the Tompkins County Bullying Prevention Task Force on November 19 in attending a Community Café on the topic of youth bullying.

A young woman opened the discussion at the Greater Ithaca Activities Center by sharing inspirational words based on her experiences with being bullied. She tasked all attendees with homework to put an end to bullying when it happens, and to listen to young people when they come to adults for help.

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The GIAC Navigators performed an original rap song “Stop Bullying” that encouraged attendees to find common ground.

The event included a short but powerful video posted on YouTube by Spokane, Washington, Public Schools that included interviews with youth of all ages about bullying.

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Participants then engaged in small-group conversations to share their own experiences, discuss existing resources and strategies, and offer ideas for bullying prevention. The information provided the attendees will be provided to the Task Force for consideration in its work.

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Representatives from more than two dozen local government agencies, community organizations, and local schools formed the Tompkins County Bullying Prevention Task Force earlier this year to explore the prevalence of youth, teen, and young adult bullying and strategies to combat it.

The Task Force plans further community cafe events throughout the county in 2020.

To learn how to participate in the Task Force’s work or inquire about future community cafe events, email thesophiefund2016@gmail.com

Bullying: We Need Your Voice

The Tompkins County Bullying Prevention Task Force is launching a series of “community cafés,” starting with an event next Tuesday November 19 from 5:30 to 7 pm at the Greater Area Ithaca Center (GIAC) 301 West Court Street in Ithaca. The event is open to parents, students, professionals, educators, and all community members. Food and childcare will be provided.

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A community café is a facilitated conversation that is used to spark creative ideas and solutions to local issues or concerns and that provides resources around a topic. The Task Force is keen to connect with local families in the community to learn about their experiences and thoughts around the topic of bullying in Tompkins County.

Specifically, we seek to gauge the awareness of local resources within our community and help inform ourselves about the current strategies being used, and what new strategies might be needed to help our youth address this important topic with success within their daily lives. We will also be seeking what resources might be needed within Tompkins County to help provide better supports for the parents of youth who are struggling with bullying.

The Task Force intends to use the information gathered at this local event to inform the larger work of the Task Force, and also help ensure that our community partners are using our local resources to garner maximum impact. While it is not always possible to prevent every single episode of bullying, we are committed to working with our local families to create safe spaces for our youth, where conversations can be had with caring adults to help them address the issue of bullying, should it ever impact them or another child in their circles.

Earlier this year, representatives from more than two dozen local government agencies, community organizations, and local schools formed the Tompkins County Bullying Prevention Task Force to explore the prevalence of youth, teen, and young adult bullying and strategies to combat it.

We hope you will consider joining us for this very important conversation next Tuesday at GIAC. We look forward to working together to help make Tompkins County a bullying free zone for everyone! If you have any questions or need further information, please reach out to the Tompkins County Youth Services Department at (607) 274-5310.

—By Kate Shanks-Booth

Kate Shanks-Booth is the director of the Tompkins County Youth Services Department and a coordinator for the Tompkins County Bullying Prevention Task Force

Tompkins Marks County’s First “Bullying Prevention Day”

Some 200 people joined a rally at the Greater Ithaca Activities Center on October 7 in a passionate show of support for the first-ever Bullying Prevention Day in Tompkins County.

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Taking a collective pledge not to bully

The rally featured a proclamation by the Tompkins County Legislature, speeches by Ithaca Police Chief Dennis Nayor, community leaders, and students, and performances by youth groups. A highlight of the rally came when attendees, wearing blue “Wash Away Bullying” t-shirts, took a collective pledge not to bully others.

“Every member of the Tompkins County community, government agencies, community organizations, school administrators, teachers, athletic coaches, parents, and students can play a part in creating a bully-free environment in our schools, athletics fields, public spaces, and online,” said Legislator Leslyn McBean-Clairborne in reading the proclamation.

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Speakers at the GIAC rally

Nayor noted that bullying can cause long-lasting struggles in people’s lives. “Some of the issues we see later on in people’s lives like criminal activity could be rooted in a person’s experiences being bullied,” Nayor said, as reported by the Cornell Daily Sun. “We at the police department are committed to trying to find solutions, and we’re open to being a resource to that.” Nayor encouraged victims of bullying to contact police if they need help.

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Ithaca Police Chief Dennis Nayor

Representatives from the Ithaca Youth Bureau, the Be the One campaign, and other organizations also attended the rally.

The rally included a performance by the GIAC Jumpers, a student dance, step, and double-dutch troupe. A group of second-to-fifth graders known as the Navigators performed a rap about kindness and a catchy rap-dance with a “don’t be a bully” message. Students also decorated the GIAC gym with handmade anti-bullying posters.

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GIAC Jumpers

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“Wash Away Bullying”

The t-shirts, with the color blue in solidarity with World Day of Bullying Prevention, were produced by GIAC’s Bitty Box Teen Entrepreneurship Program and sponsored by The Sophie Fund.

The rally was sponsored by GIAC and the Tompkins County Bullying Prevention Task Force, formed earlier this year by more than two dozen government agencies, community organizations, and representatives from school districts to explore youth bullying prevention strategies.

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Anti-Bullying Pledge

Several Tompkins County schools also marked Bullying Prevention Day on their campuses. Students and staff in the Lansing Central School District wore blue for the occasion. Students in the Lansing Middle School wrote words of encouragement in the hallway on the heels of September’s Suicide Awareness and Prevention Month.

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Lansing Central School District

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT BULLYING PREVENTION IN TOMPKINS COUNTY