Our Community Walks to Prevent Suicide

Thanks to everyone who participated in Saturday’s annual “Out of the Darkness” Walk in support of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. Our mission to save lives and bring hope to those affected by suicide would not be possible without you. This year, the 383 people taking part in the walk held in Myers Park in Lansing raised more than $34,000.

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AFSP started as a research-based organization, when a small group of families affected by suicide banded together with scientists who wanted to understand more. The funds raised in “Out of the Darkness” walks throughout the country help fund innovative and exciting research that will enable us to find better ways to stop suicide. This past year, AFSP invested nearly $5 million dollars in cutting edge scientific research.

The funds also help AFSP develop and share education programs like “Talk Saves Lives,” and “It’s Real,” a film about college students and mental health. These programs give people practical strategies for recognizing the warning signs, and preventing suicide in their communities. AFSP’s Interactive Screening Program gives students, workers, and veterans a safe way to reach out for support. Together, we are creating a culture that’s smart about mental health.

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By joining us, walkers help us to provide support to the many people affected by suicide. In the Survivor Outreach Program, for example, those who have lost a loved one to suicide can receive a visit from a trained volunteer who is also a suicide loss survivor. This way, someone who is further along in their healing journey can share their wisdom about what helped them after their loss. Our annual Survivor Day events reach more families affected by suicide each year.

The funds also enable AFSP advocates in Washington to do their work of fighting to pass legislation that will save lives. Many states now have better mental health programs and mandatory suicide prevention training for teachers. This is real and lasting change.

By joining us in Myers Park Saturday, the walkers sent the message that mental health is as real as physical health, and that reaching out for help is the strong thing to do. The walkers showed others that suicide, which is currently the tenth leading cause of death in the United States, can no longer be swept under the rug.

As a community, we know we have much to do, as we lose close to 45,000 lives to suicide every year in our country. While we are saddened by these deaths, we also see them as a call to action for our nation to do more to prevent suicide. Our annual walks help us continue to fight for a day when no one will die by suicide. By walking with us, you honor the memory of the loved ones we’ve lost.

—By Crystal Howser

Crystal Howser is the co-chair of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s Greater Ithaca Walk

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Photo credits: American Foundation for Suicide Prevention & Friends

Click here for more information about the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s Central New York chapter

Click here to add your donation to the Out of the Darkness Walk

[If you or someone you know feels the need to speak with a mental health professional, you can contact the Crisisline (National Suicide Prevention Lifeline) at 1-800-273-8255 or contact the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741-741.]

Preventing Suicide

September is National Suicide Prevention Month (and September 10-16 is National Suicide Prevention Week). It’s a great time to learn what we can all do to save lives.

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Whether or not you have concerns about yourself or a friend or loved one, check out the website of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) today to watch videos and read expert advice on how to help people who may be struggling.

Click here for AFSP videos and webpages on topics such as how to start a conversion about suicide, talking about the topic with young people as well as the elderly.

Click here for a list of AFSP-recommended resources for crisis services, mental health care, and specific issues like bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, depression, eating disorders, stress, and suicide prevention.

Around the country, local chapters of the AFSP organize “Out of the Darkness” walks to raise money for research, educational programs, advocacy, and supporting survivors of suicide loss. Coinciding with National Suicide Prevention Week, the Greater Ithaca walk takes place on Saturday, September 14 from 12 Noon to 2 p.m.

Click here to register for the Out of the Darkness Greater Ithaca Walk or to make a donation now to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

[If you or someone you know feels the need to speak with a mental health professional, you can contact the Crisisline (National Suicide Prevention Lifeline) at 1-800-273-8255 or contact the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741-741.]

Coping After a Suicide Death

A 2018 study found that on average 135 people are exposed to and may be affected by a person’s suicide death. This means that 5.5 million Americans are hit by a suicide loss every year. These findings highlight the importance of broader “postvention”— support for people who may be seriously impacted by grief, guilt, shame, isolation, depression, suicidal thoughts, or other responses to a suicide death.

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Volunteers from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention provides an online library of resources for coping with suicide loss.

A few examples:

Children, Teens, and Suicide Loss

After a Suicide: A Toolkit for Schools

Postvention: A Guide for Response to Suicide on College Campuses

Personal Support for Survivors of Suicide Loss

Taking Care of Yourself

In addition, Ithaca’s Suicide Prevention & Crisis Service offers postvention services—click here for more information.

From SPCS’s website:

Trauma is an emotional response to challenging and unexpected events that can cause a great deal of stress, upset everyday routine, and interfere with your ability to function.

After-Trauma Services can help you cope with the stress of these sudden life events.

If you are a resident of Tompkins County in New York State, learn more about services here, or just call at 607-272-1505 to schedule.

Up to 8 free counseling sessions. Client and therapist create an intention for maximizing time together. Included are basic tools for ‘getting grounded’; education on what trauma is and it’s impact on human beings; development of healing plans; support and assistance in referral process.

Support Group for people coping with the loss of a loved one who died by suicide. Meetings are the first and third Tuesday of every month at 6:30pm. Please call 607-272-1505 to express interest in joining this group.

First Monday Group. On the first Monday of each month, at noon, colleagues in the field of mental health meet in the library of SPCS to learn from each other. Readings in between meetings inform the discussion.

Family sessions to process, collectively, traumas that have impacted everyone.

Facilitated workplace group discussions following a tragedy.

For more information or schedule an appointment with Sheila McCue, the director of After-Trauma Services here at SPCS, please email postvention@ithacacrisis.org or call 607-272-1505

To learn more about how Tompkins County is working to prevent suicide, click here.

Why I Walk for Suicide Prevention

September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. Ithaca will host its seventh annual “Out of the Darkness” community walk and fundraiser on Saturday, September 15 in support of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP). The walk takes place at the Cass Park Waterfront Trail, with registration starting at 10:30 a.m.

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Ithaca’s “Out of the Darkness” walk for suicide prevention

“Out of the Darkness” walks are held all across the country to raise funds for new research, educational programs, public policy advocacy, and supporting survivors of suicide loss. The walks raise awareness about suicide prevention, and support free education programs and survivor reach-out programs in our local community. Our fundraising goal for the Ithaca walk is $25,000.

I will be walking again on September 15 because I am a survivor of my dad’s suicide 12 years ago. He ended his life on November 28, 2005. I felt at the time that my world was crashing.

I was not sure how I could live without my dad, my hero, my other half. Before my father’s death, two of my cousins died by suicide. Ronnie took his own life when I was a little girl, and David died by suicide when I was a senior in high school.

Suicide and depression were never spoken about in my family. They were hushed subjects. Today, I am changing that. I am speaking out, educating, and erasing the stigma.

When my dad died, I was lost. I felt alone in the world. I could not think. My dad and many of my family members suffered and do suffer from depression. I never comprehended the impact of mental illness until the day my dad was gone. I myself went into a deep depression. I was losing my own fight. My husband and friends became worried. A few friends that insisted that I needed therapy. I fought them, but ended up going.

I was diagnosed with bi-polar disorder. I struggled for many years with thoughts of suicide and a suicide attempt. I have learned, though, that I am not alone. I have a support network and a family within AFSP.

So here I am, today, serving as the co-chair of Ithaca’s 2018 “Out of the Darkness” walk. Every day, I am stronger. Every day, the sun is brighter. I have all my happy memories, a memory box that I go to for strength. At the walk on September 15, I will be wearing gold beads for the loss of my dad, purple beads for the loss of family and friends, green beads for my own struggle, teal beads because I have loved ones who struggle, and blue beads because I support the cause.

—By Stacy Ayres

Stacy Ayres is the board chair of the Central New York Chapter of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. She lives in Freeville where she is mom to a 16-year-old, 13-year-old, and a 9-year-old. She operates Little Sunshine Daycare, and attends all types of concerts, and loves to cheer at her children’s sporting events.

Come along and bring your family and friends to join Ithaca’s “Out of the Darkness” community walk on Saturday, September 15, at the Cass Park Waterfront Trail. Start raising funds as an individual or as a team by registering online now (or also at the registration desk in Cass Park Pavilion on September 15). For more information, call (607) 327-3370 or email: ithacaafsp@gmail.com

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[If you or someone you know feels the need to speak with a mental health professional, you can contact the Crisisline (National Suicide Prevention Lifeline) at 1-800-273-8255 or contact the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741-741.]

 

Finding Hope: Battling America’s Suicide Crisis

Watch Anderson Cooper’s CNN town hall, “Finding Hope: Battling America’s Suicide Crisis,” an excellent program exploring the risk factors for suicide, ways to reach out for help, and how to aid somebody who may be struggling.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline can be reached by dialing 1-800-273-8255. It provides free and confidential support 24 hours a day, seven days a week for people in suicidal crisis or distress, or for those who are helping a person in crisis.

The recent deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain prompted a national conversation about suicide. Anderson Cooper’s Town Hall aired Sunday June 24 and featured the following guests who shared their expertise and experience of being touched by suicide:

Anderson Cooper, CNN anchor

Glenn Close and Jessie Close, actor and her sister

David Axelrod, former advisor to President Barack Obama

Karl Rove, former advisor to President George W. Bush

Christine Moutier, chief medical officer, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

Talinda Bennington, widow of Linkin Park lead singer Chester Bennington, co-founder of 320 Changes Direction

Kirsten Powers, USA Today columnist

Randi Kaye, CNN reporter

Zak Williams, son actor and comedian Robin Williams

Jane Clementi, co-founder Tyler Clementi Foundation

James Hatch, former U.S. Navy SEALs member

Sanjay Gupta, neurosurgeon and CNN chief medical correspondent.

Jordan Burnham, Active Minds mental health advocate

Dese’Rae L. Stage, artist, public speaker, and suicide prevention activist, creator of Live Through This